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The Protagonist Speaks

Interviews with the protagonists of your favourite books

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Novel

Nikola Tesla (of Tesla’s Signal by Laura Woodswalker)

TESLA'S SIGNAL - Laura WoodswalkerDear readers, tonight with me is a special person, one who has turned into a cultural icon of our generation. The Protagonist is honoured to welcome Nikola Tesla to the interview couch!

Tonight he will tell us about his amazing discoveries, and his almost unnatural connection to electrical currents.

 

 

Can you describe to us your affinity to electricity? How does it feel / look?

As a child I could feel the lightning building up to strike, and I ran to touch it. Miraculously, instead of being killed, I felt as if my body and soul had come alive. The sensation was like you might feel the wind in your face, or a spray of water. I did not realize that others didn’t feel this and that I was something of a freak.

Because of my extreme sensitivity to currents and light, I developed what others might call Phobias. I did not like to look at women’s jewellery because of how it bent the light. I started trying to control this sensitivity through calculations. Numbers, especially the number 3, were like an invisible structure that I wove around the world. I always had to do everything by 3’s. After I nearly died of cholera, I became terrified of germs and reluctant to shake hands. I obsessively washed my eating utensils. People thought I was quite an eccentric! Some even thought I was mad…a ‘mad scientist’ if you will.

How did this affinity affect your scientific work?

My brain was like a finely tuned receiver. I could visualize the inside of devices…and when I built them, they worked perfectly! I could travel to imaginary places and speak with the people I met. My sensitivity became so painfully intense that I thought I would surely die…and that was when I received a communication from a race of energy beings who spoke to me in currents. This was not a hallucination: the Aon were from the dimension of ‘subtle matter’. They spent their lives studying the universe, and now they wished to study and exchange knowledge with me.

This meeting stimulated my brain to make new connections, and I was struck by a most  transcendent vision of the rotating magnetic field, which would become the 3-phase alternating current motor. This was the breakthrough which led to the gift of electrical power for all of the world. Continue reading “Nikola Tesla (of Tesla’s Signal by Laura Woodswalker)”

Sheshamun (of Behind Palace Walls by Erin Chase)

Erin Chase - Behind Palace Walls Book coverDear readers, tonight with us is a woman elevated to the highest order – the Pharaoh’s own court, and then rudely ejected by rivals within. She is here to tell us about life in Ancient Egypt.

 

 

What were your first few days in the palace’s harem like?

My first few days in the palace’s harem were very overwhelming! It is the complete opposite of a peasant’s life. I mean the food… goodness! Succulent duck and quail, honey drizzled on everything, fragrant wine, and the sweetmeats… oh the sweetmeats!

Sorry, what was the question again? Oh right, my introduction to the concubine lifestyle. Well on the plus side, I met my great friend Serera in the harem, as well as Manon, the Keeper of the Harem. I loved lounging by the water, playing Senet or Dogs and Jackals, and sharing my intimate secrets with Serera.

However, when it came to dealing with a couple of the other, more established concubines, life was tough! Senra and her partner in crime from the Far East, Tokahiru, sure knew how to make my life a living hell. Continue reading “Sheshamun (of Behind Palace Walls by Erin Chase)”

Thea (of Mistress of Rome by Kate Quinn)

Mistress of Rome - Kate QuinnDear readers, tonight with me is a woman who came to us as a Judaean slave girl, only to catch the eye of our divine emperor. she is here to tell us of her remarkable journey, and about the highest echelons of Roman society.

 

 

What were your first impressions of Rome, after being sold to slavery in Judea?

I survived the suicide massacre of Masada when I was about four years old; one of seven survivors. The rest of my family died, and then I was enslaved and brought west. I don’t remember much of Judaea, but even so, Rome has never felt like home to me. It’s hot, teeming, raucous, and quite frequently cruel.

Is Emperor Domitian as bad in person as the senate makes him out to be?

It depends which side of him you see, and he has as many sides as a set of dice. To his soldiers he is blunt, honest, brave–they worship him. To the Senate he is arrogant, overbearing, dismissive–they despise him. To his family is he capricious, fearful, fickle–they quiver before him. To me . . . well. I fascinate him because he doesn’t frighten me. He likes to test that, and it’s kept me alive so far. Continue reading “Thea (of Mistress of Rome by Kate Quinn)”

President Carlos Almanzor (of Revolution Day by T. E. Taylor)

Revolution Day

Dear readers, tonight we are honoured to host a busy man, who nonetheless found the time to be with us. Please welcome President Almanzor to the interview couch!

 

 

Tell us about your childhood. What events helped shaped you to be who you are today?

That time seems so distant now, almost unreal.  It was an ordinary childhood, I suppose.  I cannot claim I lived in hardship: my parents were middle class, comfortably off.  They were ambitious, and at first I was willing to follow the legal career they had mapped out for me.  But there were a lot of poorer people in our neighbourhood, and I realised I could use my skills to help them.  That was what set me on the long road that has brought me here, though I had no idea where it would lead at the time.

What first drew you to the revolution?

At first I was a campaigner rather than a revolutionary: I sought social change through protest and through the courts.  But every faltering step towards progress was met by reactionary counter-measures, every demonstration by violent repression.  I came to believe that peaceful means alone could not succeed.  So I talked to the communists, and we all recognised that what we agreed on was more important than what we disagreed on.  We became a broad church united in the goal of overthrowing the Velazco regime.  Thus the Partido Socialista was born. Continue reading “President Carlos Almanzor (of Revolution Day by T. E. Taylor)”

Dr. Skylar Santangelo (of Healing The Witch Of Adelaide Glen by J.C. Stockli)

JC Stockli - Healing The Witch Of Adelaide GlenDear readers, tonight with me is one of our leading legal prosecutors. As it turns out, his grudge against the paranormal and supernatural lies with some dark secrets in his past.

 

 

Tell us about where you grew up and studied. How did you get from slums to academia? What is your PhD about?

[chuckles] Mamma moved to the States when I was real young. I grew up in a housing project in the south end of the city. I never aspired to leave the hood. I liked it there. I was someone to be known there, but every smart-ass punk has it coming to him, I guess. I chose academia over incarceration. My boys from back on the day found their path on the straight and narrow and guided me along. I’d be dead without those guys, no doubt. In terms of my PhD, the only subjects that made sense were theology and demonology. I’m what you’d call a “subject matter expert.”

Tell us about those tats – what made you get them? Is there an overall design?

[turns head down with a furrowed brow] There’s a method to every man’s madness. Some of my ink is just the result of being a stupid punk. Others…? Yeah, they mean something… but we’re not getting into that here. Next question, man. Continue reading “Dr. Skylar Santangelo (of Healing The Witch Of Adelaide Glen by J.C. Stockli)”

Kate of (Awakening by Janet Forster)

Awakening - The Last Anakim - Janet ForsterDear readers, tonight with me is a young woman, born to become an angel. In a world on the verge of destruction, Kate is here to tell us of fallen angels and the struggles of love.

 

 

What was your childhood like?

Mmm, let’s see. I was packed up, my life in a bag, and shunted off to boarding school because my parents’ relationship was all over the place. They were together one minute, separated the next and then back together again. Even Noodle, our already anxious Labradoodle, was considering an extended vacation! I was the ‘peace-maker’ in the family, but it was stressful always being the one to try and get Mum and Dad to kiss and make up. I turned to music … literally drowned myself in the magical world of sound I discovered.

My best times were spent with Nanny. I used to stay at her home at the beach a lot, sometimes for the whole holiday. We’d eat fish and chips and jam donuts for lunch and I was always barefoot and sunburned. She was my very first piano teacher. I remember the brandy and water she sipped swaying in a small crystal tumbler on top of her old upright piano as I played Für Elise and the smell of lavender as she reached across me to turn the pages. Continue reading “Kate of (Awakening by Janet Forster)”

Talasara (from Tribrid by Tracy Palmer)

Tracy Palmer - TribridDear readers, tonight is a full moon, but we were promised that we are quite safe in hosting this young woman on the interview couch. She has only recently come out of thee hundred years of seclusion, keeping her nature secret while studying witchcraft.

 

 

When were you born? What do you remember of your childhood?

I was born in 1703 a few miles outside of Glasgow, Scotland. As for what I remember from my childhood… everything. For some reason, I can remember nearly every minute of my life and the things that have happened. I can even remember the sound of my mother’s voice. Even though she technically died before I was born. Sometimes that ability comes in handy. Other times… well… it can be a burden. Especially when I think about the people that I have lost in my lifetime. Continue reading “Talasara (from Tribrid by Tracy Palmer)”

Miri Katz (of P.A.W.S. by Debbie Manber Kupfer)

Debbie Mamber Kupfer - PAWSDear readers, tonight with me is a young woman, who following her grandmother’s death had uncovered some dark family secrets. Forced into a boarding school and taunted by bullies, her heirloom opens new possibilities for her.

 

 

What do you remember of your parents and grandmother? Was there ever a clue that your family might be different?

I was brought up by my omama (grandmother) Celia Katz. My mother Nora left me with her wrapped in a blue shawl shortly after I was born and I’ve never seen her since. I don’t know who my father was.

It doesn’t matter though as I loved growing up with Omama. She came originally from Vienna and used to make these wonderful Viennese cakes. When I think back to it I think maybe there was magic in those desserts – I’ve tried to bake cakes like hers and never succeeded. I miss Omama a lot. She died on my tenth birthday. Continue reading “Miri Katz (of P.A.W.S. by Debbie Manber Kupfer)”

Megan O’Reilly (of Foul is Fair by Jeffrey Cook and Katherine Perkins)

Foul is Fair Dear readers, tonight with me is young girl, suffering from ADHD. Like many young girls her age, she always dreamt she was a Fairy Princess.

One day, she found out that was true. Things got complicated from there.

 

 

When you grew up, did you have any clues about your family being different?

I thought it was the /regular/ kind of different. I didn’t have any contact with my dad, and not much information about him. It was just me and my mom — and my ADHD, and Mom’s depression and other issues.

What was it like growing up with ADHD?

When I was little, it flew under the radar, because I wasn’t the type that got in trouble in school. I just had an overactive imagination, and you can get away with that when you’re little–and gosh, who knows how much of that now was imagination and how much was seeing actual Faerie things until I hushed because Mom didn’t want to hear about it. Homework still mostly got done, while hanging with Lani, and any time I wasn’t with Lani, I was drawing. And, well, a lot of time with Lani, I was drawing. Even in class, I was drawing, but you can get away with that when you’re little, too. When you’re older, not so much. Continue reading “Megan O’Reilly (of Foul is Fair by Jeffrey Cook and Katherine Perkins)”

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